This site is intended for healthcare professionals

Go to /sign-in page

You can view 5 more pages before signing in

Coagulase-negative staphylococcus

Last reviewed dd mmm yyyy. Last edited dd mmm yyyy

Authoring team

Staph. epidermidis is normally resident in the skin flora, the gut and upper respiratory tract. It is a true opportunistic pathogen, requiring a major breach in the host's infection to establish infection, and invariably is hospital acquired. It is associated with skin penetration by implanted prostheses, for example Spitz Holter valves used to treat hydrocephalus, prosthetic heart valves, IV lines, intraperitoneal catheters and orthopaedic prostheses. It is a major cause of bacteraemia in neutropenics and in all infections there is a risk of endocarditis. It is also a serious neonatal infection, particularly in very low birth weight infants.

Staph. epidermidis produces some toxins but their significance is unknown. Adherence to a foreign surface is facilitated by the production of a viscous extracellular (proteoglycans) slime.

Staph. epidermidis is coagulase negative.


Related pages

Create an account to add page annotations

Add information to this page that would be handy to have on hand during a consultation, such as a web address or phone number. This information will always be displayed when you visit this page