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Childhood immunisation schedule

Last reviewed dd mmm yyyy. Last edited dd mmm yyyy

Authoring team

The vaccines that children and adults should receive are included in the tables below:

The complete schedule as of September 2023 is:

Routine childhood immunisations

When

Diseases protected against

Vaccine given

Trade name

Usual site[footnote 1]

8 weeks old

Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and hepatitis B

DTaP/IPV/Hib/HepB

Infanrix hexa or Vaxelis

Thigh

Meningococcal group B (MenB)

MenB

Bexsero

Left thigh

Rotavirus gastroenteritis

Rotavirus

Rotarix [footnote 2]

By mouth

12 weeks old

Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, Hib and hepatitis B

DTaP/IPV/Hib/HepB

Infanrix hexa or Vaxelis

Thigh

Pneumococcal (13 serotypes)

PCV

Prevenar 13

Thigh

Rotavirus

Rotavirus

Rotarix [footnote 2]

By mouth

16 weeks old

Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, Hib and hepatitis B

DTaP/IPV/Hib/HepB

Infanrix hexa or Vaxelis

Thigh

MenB

MenB

Bexsero

Left thigh

One years old (on or after the child’s first birthday)

Hib and Meningococcal group C (MenC)

Hib/MenC

Menitorix

Upper arm or thigh

Pneumococcal

PCV booster

Prevenar 13

Upper arm or thigh

Measles, mumps and rubella (German measles)

MMR

MMRvaxPro [footnote 3] or Priorix

Upper arm or thigh

MenB

MenB booster

Bexsero

Left thigh

Eligible paediatric age group[footnote 4]

Influenza (each year from September)

Live attenuated influenza vaccine LAIV

Both nostrils

3 years 4 months old or soon after

Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio

dTaP/IPV

Boostrix-IPV

Upper arm

Measles, mumps and rubella

MMR (check first dose given)

MMRvaxPro [footnote 3] or Priorix

Upper arm

Boys and girls aged 12 to 13 years

Cancers and genital warts caused by specific human papillomavirus (HPV) types

Gardasil 9

Upper arm

14 years old (school Year 9)

Tetanus, diphtheria and polio

Td/IPV (check MMR status)

Revaxis

Upper arm

Meningococcal groups A, C, W and Y

MenACWY

Nimenrix

Upper arm

Selective childhood immunisation programmes

Target group

Age and schedule

Disease

Vaccines required

Babies born to hepatitis B infected mothers

At birth, 4 weeks and 12 months old [footnote 7], [footnote 8]

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B (Engerix B/HBvaxPRO)

Infants in areas of the country with tuberculosis (TB) incidence >= 40/100,000

Around 28 days old [footnote 9]

Tuberculosis

BCG

Infants with a parent or grandparent born in a high incidence country [footnote 10]

Around 28 days old [footnote 9]

Tuberculosis

BCG

Children in a clinical risk group

From 6 months to 17 years of age

Influenza

LAIV or inactivated flu vaccine if contraindicated to LAIV or under 2 years of age

Pregnant women

At any stage of pregnancy during flu season

Influenza

Inactivated flu vaccine

From 16 weeks gestation

Pertussis

dTaP/IPV (Boostrix-IPV)

  1. Intramuscular injection into deltoid muscle in upper arm or anterolateral aspect of the thigh.

 

  1. Rotavirus vaccine should only be given after checking for a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) screening result. 2

 

  1. Contains porcine gelatine. 2 3

 

  1. See annual flu letter

 

  1. If LAIV (live attenuated influenza vaccine) is contraindicated or otherwise unsuitable use inactivated flu vaccine (check Green Book chapter 19 for details).

 

  1. See Green Book chapter 18a for immunising immunocompromised young people who will need 3 doses.

 

  1. Take blood for HBsAg at 12 months to exclude infection.

 

  1. In addition hexavalent vaccine (Infanrix hexa or Vaxelis) is given at 8, 12 and 16 weeks.

 

  1. Check SCID screening outcome before giving BCG. 2

 

  1. Where the annual incidence of TB is >= 40/100,000 - see tuberculosis by country: rates per 100,000 people

For further information about the immunisation schedule then accesshttp://www.immunisation.nhs.uk/

Note that hepatitis B vaccine should be given soon after birth, at 4 weeks, 8 weeks and 12 months if the mother is known to hepatitis surface antigen positive.

Note also that adults should receive:

  • if previously unimmunised: polio, tetanus and diphtheria
  • sero-negative women: rubella
  • high risk groups: hepatitis A and B, influenza and pneumococcal vaccines

Reference:

  1. Public Health England (September 2023). Routine childhood immunisations Schedule.

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