elevated eosinophils

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This occurs where the eosinophil count is greater than 0.44 x 10^9/l. It may be a feature of the following conditions:

  • asthma and allergic disorders - asthma, hypersensitivity, drugs, angioneurotic oedema
  • parasitic infections - especially schistosomiasis, echinococciasis
  • polyarteritis nodosa
  • Churg-Strauss syndrome
  • Addison's disease
  • skin disease - pemphigus, urticaria, eczema, dermatitis herpetiformis, erythema multiforme
  • malignancy:
    • Hodgkin's disease
    • carcinoma
    • haematological malignancies:
      • chronic myeloid leukaemia
      • other myeloproliferative syndromes
      • eosinophilic leukaemia
  • Loeffler's syndrome
  • Loeffler's endocarditis
  • scarlet fever
  • irradiation
  • during convalescence from any infection
  • hypereosinophilic syndrome
  • post-splenectomy
  • cholesterol emboli syndrome
  • drugs - penicillins, streptomycin

 

If raised eosinophil count in an adult (3):

Reference:

  • Felig P et al (2001) Endocrinology and Metabolism. McGraw-Hill.
  • Hart FD (Ed) (2005). French's Index of Differential Diagnosis.
  • NHS Camden CCG. Abnormal FBC guidance - for adults (Accessed 30/10/19)

Last edited 10/2019

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