prognosis

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  • More than half (55%) of people diagnosed with bone sarcoma in England survive their disease for ten years or more (2009-2013)

  • More than 6 in 10 (62%) people diagnosed with bone sarcoma in England survive their disease for five years or more (2009-2013)

  • More than 8 in 10 (83%) people diagnosed with bone sarcoma in England survive their disease for one year or more (2009-2013)

  • Bone sarcoma 10-year survival in England is similar in men and women (2009-2013)

  • Bone sarcoma five-year survival in England in males is highest for those diagnosed at 50-59 years old and in females is highest for those diagnosed at 15-49 years old (2009-2013)

  • More than 7 in 10 people in England diagnosed with bone sarcoma aged 50-59 survive their disease for five years or more, compared with around 4 in 10 people diagnosed aged 70-89 (2009-2013)

Five-year survival for bone sarcoma is highest in younger men and women and decreases with increasing age.

Five-year net survival in men ranges from 71% in 50-59 year-olds to 44% in 70-89 year-olds for patients diagnosed with bone sarcoma in England during 2009-2013. In women, five-year survival ranges from 75% in 15-49 year olds to 38% in 70-89 year olds.

A review states (2):

  • most important prognostic factor is the presence of metastasis at the time of diag-nosis
    • patients with local disease that responds to multimodal therapy currently have a 5-year survival rate of more than 70%
    • less than 30% of patients presenting with metastases survive for 5 years
    • patients with metastasis limited to the lung have a better prognosis than those with metastasis to the bone or bone marrow
    • in the absence of metastasis, the tumor site constitutes the single most important prognostic factor, with a worse outcome for patients with proximal primary tumors (i.e., in the pelvis and sacrum) than for patients with distal tumors
    • other clinical indicators of unfavorable evolution include a large primary neoplasm, older age at diagnosis (>18 years), and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase levels.

Reference:

Last edited 01/2021 and last reviewed 01/2021