epidemiology

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  • around 3,200 new cervical cancer cases in the UK every year, that's more than 8 every day (2015-2017).

  • in females in the UK, cervical cancer is the 14th most common cancer, with around 3,100 new cases in 2017
    .
  • cervical cancer accounts for 2% of all new cancer cases in females in the UK (2017)

  • cervical cancer accounts for less than 1% of all new cancer cases in females and males combined in the UK (2017).

  • incidence rates for cervical cancer in the UK are highest in females aged 30 to 34 (2015-2017)*
    .
  • each year around a tenth (9%) of all new cervical cancer cases in the UK are diagnosed in females aged 75 and over (2015-2017)

  • since the early 1990s, cervical cancer incidence rates have decreased by a quarter (25%) in females in the UK (2015-2017)

  • over the last decade, cervical cancer incidence rates have remained stable in females in the UK (2015-2017)

  • cervical cancer incidence rates are likely to fall in future decades, according to projections accounting for the expected impact of HPV vaccination.

  • cervical cancer incidence rates in England in females are 65% higher in the most deprived quintile compared with the least (2013-2017).

  • around 520 cases of cervical cancer each year in England are linked with deprivation

  • cervical cancer is more common in White females than in Asian females, but similar to Black females, but Asian and Black females are similar to each other
  • it is possible for women of all ages to develop cervical cancer, but traditionally the condition mainly affected sexually active women aged between 30 and 45 years of age, however, data from Cancer Research UK shows the peak age of incidence has reduced to 25-29 years of age (2). Cervical cancer is very rare in women under 25 years old and may be more difficult to prevent in younger age women

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Last edited 10/2020 and last reviewed 10/2020